Oklahoma based photographer, writer and jack of all tracks.

 

Since I haven’t posted anything in a while, I thought I’d go ahead and share some photos of our rescue can, Jackson. As you can tell from some of the photos, he’s a manx, no tail whatsoever. He’s also probably the sweetest cat I’ve ever been around.

thatscienceguy:

As children we’re taught the process of a caterpillar turning into a butterfly, and the story normally goes along the lines of a hungry caterpillar eats and eats until it can eat no longer, then it hangs upside down and forms a chrysalis, from which a beautiful butterfly emerges.
But what actually happens inside the cocoon?
It’s actually quite surprising, the caterpillar does not merely change its body a bit and grow wings, no… It dissolves. Almost entirely. The caterpillar excretes an enzyme which decomposes all the tissues and fibres into basic organic material, leaving only a few ‘cell disks.’
These cell disks comprise all the different types of cells in an adult butterfly - its eyes, legs, wings, etc. The caterpillar is actually born with them but they just remain dormant until metamorphosis. 
Once all the caterpillars cells have been decomposed the adult cell disks then start to grow, using the organic materials left over, eventually forming the butterfly that emerges a few days later.

This is really fascinating, as I’d never really looked too much into the process before. I’m going to have to now, as I’m really curious as to the theories on how this process evolved.

thatscienceguy:

As children we’re taught the process of a caterpillar turning into a butterfly, and the story normally goes along the lines of a hungry caterpillar eats and eats until it can eat no longer, then it hangs upside down and forms a chrysalis, from which a beautiful butterfly emerges.

But what actually happens inside the cocoon?

It’s actually quite surprising, the caterpillar does not merely change its body a bit and grow wings, no… It dissolves. Almost entirely. The caterpillar excretes an enzyme which decomposes all the tissues and fibres into basic organic material, leaving only a few ‘cell disks.’

These cell disks comprise all the different types of cells in an adult butterfly - its eyes, legs, wings, etc. The caterpillar is actually born with them but they just remain dormant until metamorphosis. 

Once all the caterpillars cells have been decomposed the adult cell disks then start to grow, using the organic materials left over, eventually forming the butterfly that emerges a few days later.

This is really fascinating, as I’d never really looked too much into the process before. I’m going to have to now, as I’m really curious as to the theories on how this process evolved.

More photos from my June 1st trip to the Oklahoma City Zoo. Really need to get back soon, as I’m already missing the place.

Also, it’s work mentioning that a few of my best wildlife prints, along with some other odds and ends, are up on up for auction on eBay. The proceeds from the sales will be put toward the “upgrading my gear” fund, as I think I’ve finally reached the point I’m outgrowing my current rig again.

I wanted to step out of my comfort zone and try some new things as a photography, so I called on an old friend.

I knew I was getting Ultra Magnus before I opened a single package that birthday afternoon. I can’t remember how my brother stumbled across it, but he’d found first Metroplex and later Ultra Magnus in the storage cabinet under my dad’s workbench in the garage. The day before, my mom actually caught me looking. Karma bit back; Scamper, the little robot that came with Metroplex, broke that first day.

Somewhere along the way, Ultra Magnus lost his head. Well, one of them, anyway. I don’t know if it was a prank from one of the neighborhood kids that always joined in the battle between Autobots and Decepticons, a random accident, or the result of childhood curiosity. Either way, without the smaller, inner head, Magnus couldn’t put on the helmet that gave him the more familiar appearance from the comics and cartoon.

I don’t remember where the old Optimus Prime came into things, but I remember how beat up he was. Missing an arm, legs completely loose, and the plastic windows busted out. But he still had a head, and through the miracle of remolds, Magnus’s “inner” robot was the same as the original Autobot leader. A few turns of a screwdriver, and the City Commander rejoined the battle.

His trailer and other accessories were lost to a series of moves, and he’s certainly seen better days. But Ultra Magnus joined me on road trips through Texas and moves across state lines. He was there when friends moved away, and when my parents divorced. And even now, he’s a link back to my childhood and a love of giant robots that I have not, and probably never will, let go.

Maybe I should show the old guy more respect.

No matter how big and strong we see ourselves, there are times when we’ve got to lean on someone else.
Photo taken at the Oklahoma City Zoo using my new Sigma lens. Still working to try and pull better color out of my images, but this image just sort of resonated with me after the last couple of weeks.

No matter how big and strong we see ourselves, there are times when we’ve got to lean on someone else.

Photo taken at the Oklahoma City Zoo using my new Sigma lens. Still working to try and pull better color out of my images, but this image just sort of resonated with me after the last couple of weeks.

prettyarbitrary:

random-nexus:

platoapproved:

tchy:

dark-vowelled:

sclez:

durendals:

there is literally no difference between academic scholars discussing their interpretations of a text and a bunch of people yelling YOUR HEADCANON IS WRONG at each other

As a Masters student I can vouch for this.

The difference is citations.

The tags are our footnotes and our commentary, as well as random sass peer review.

It’s truuuuuuuuueeeeee.

Sadly, this is also true of science if there’s not enough evidence to disprove one or the other. Let us never forget that the name “Big Bang” was coined by a supporter of the steady state universe theory because he thought it was ridiculous, even as evidence grew to support the theory. That’s pretty much a science way of saying “This episode isn’t part of my personal head canon.”

Some very early shots from today’s zoo trip to test the new Sigma lens. The only real downside to it is that there’s no vibration reduction of any kind, so the photos aren’t as sharp as I’d like. Still, I’m pretty pleased with how these turned out for being shot with a “prosumer” DSLR and a budget lens by someone with no formal training.

Jackson would like the world to know just how much suffering and hardship he endures on a daily basis. These photos document his difficult daily routine.