Oklahoma based photographer, writer and jack of all tracks.

 

How about some new photography? It’s been a while, so here are the photos I entered in this year’s Oklahoma State Fair. The image of the baby orangutan won fourth place in the Nature and Wildlife category. Pretty pleased with that, but seeing what everyone else did this year, I really need to step up my game for next year. If anyone was interested, here’s the list of what category and what the photo’s of…

Nature - Orangutan, San Diego Zoo

Pets - Jackson, our manx cat

Misc - Custom car from Count’s Kustoms in Las Vegas

Nighttime and Twllight - Hill overlooking Dana Point Harbor in California

Weather - Rain on the highway in Death Valley(yes, seriously)

Floral - Shelter Island in California

American Landscapes - Shelter Island in California

Motion - Common dolphins off the coast of California

Let’s face it, the only thing missing from this is Link landing in the tree, putting on sunglasses and The Who played triumphantly.
And as if you weren’t impressed enough? Yep, that shield appears to be made of wood.

Let’s face it, the only thing missing from this is Link landing in the tree, putting on sunglasses and The Who played triumphantly.

And as if you weren’t impressed enough? Yep, that shield appears to be made of wood.

(Source: suluj)

My Conflicting Feelings on Sword Art Online

This seems totally relevant in light of today’s episode. I wasn’t as down on it as some of the fans have been, but I honestly think it highlights the issues I have with the series. And it bothers me because when this show clicks for me, it REALLY clicks for me. And I think there are some really interesting ideas, and from what I’ve seen of the translations of the first two light novels, they get developed a little more in there. Anyhow… my rambling thoughts on it all under the cut for spoilers…

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Sword Art Online Light Novels and SAO2

So I’m currently working my way through the second Sword Art Online novel that was released in English(I would have been done already, except work has enjoyed keeping me there 10-12+ hours a night, so there hasn’t been a lot of free time). The translations are pretty good, and I’m enjoying seeing the side stories I first saw in the anime. I’ve come to appreciate Lisbeth even more, and really wish she’d have a bigger role in the later story arcs. She’s got a lot of potential, and it would be fun to see that explored somewhere. I’d honestly recommend checking both the novels out, as they give a little more of the characters.

And of course, I can’t mention SAO without talking about how much I’m really enjoying the new Sword Art Online 2. Sinon’s a really good character, and some of the stuff with Kirito in his new avatar is pretty funny. The Death Gun plot is pretty intriguing and I really can’t wait to see the new episode. And they’ve done an AMAZING job of setting up some great cliffhangers. The last couple episodes have been positively Sleepy Hollow-esque(and that’s a really high compliment in my book).

I’m also glad I avoided some of the fan translations of the GGO novels, as it’s fun to watch this story unfold. I’m also glad that, despite the fact she’s not in GGO, they’re giving Asuna more to do than just sit around and watch. And most of all for me, being such a fan of the Aincrad arc, it was really fun to step back into that world, albeit briefly. I wouldn’t be opposed to more flashbacks like that, for sure.

I really hope the whole season holds up, because thus far, I’ve been pretty impressed.

cutemutant:

starklyinaccurate:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.
If you are healthy, please reblog.If you are sick, please reblog.If you have a disability, please reblog.If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.If you are a human being, please reblog.Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 
Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

And people ask me why I am afraid to use my cane in public.Being disabled, visibly so is always dangerous

my friend (who is a year younger than me, and we were about 18 when this happened) has a disability and has a parking permit, and one time we went out to lunch and he parked in the handicapped spot and this lady was driving by and she like slowed down when she saw us getting out of the car and like glared and we were like whatever, so we went into the restaurant and while we were waiting to get seated, some other ppl in the restaurant told him “i think that lady is doing something to your car” and we look out and shes like… inspecting the car or something like looking around it suspiciously, and so he went out to confront her and she ran off. it was so shady. people are fuckin scumbags

The last couple of years, I’ve had surgeries that have involved incisions to my abdomen. As anyone who’s been through that knows, that makes you learn REAL QUICK how important your core muscles are. I’d usually wear out and, especially in the summer/early fall months, overheat really fast from the strain. So, my physician gives me a temporary placard and advises me to use motorized carts when possible. 
I can’t begin to tell you the number of dirty looks I’d get from people because, outside of sometimes using a walking stick, it wasn’t immediately obvious that there was anything wrong. If I happened to be in a store and stood up to get something from the shelf? Yep, there were a few times I got some looks and heard a few comments of the “under the breath” variety, usually just accusing me of being lazy.
The worst example came when I decided to head to the zoo for my birthday a month after surgery. People had no consideration, making it really hard for me to get around. At one particular exhibit, I was trying to navigate the cart closer, and an older gentlemen pushed his children ahead of me. I actually spoke up, offering a pretty sarcastic “excuse me” to him. He actually turned out, looked at me a moment, and said, “You don’t get special treatment just because you’re lazy.”
(It got better when another guy actually stood up for me and called the dad out on his BS, then told his kid to NOT act like that guy. Kind of an awesome moment.)
The experience really did open my eyes to what people go through, and it certainly taught me never to judge just because I can’t see what a person’s handicap is. I’m reminded of the great quote from Wendy Mass: “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about.”

cutemutant:

starklyinaccurate:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.

If you are healthy, please reblog.
If you are sick, please reblog.
If you have a disability, please reblog.
If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.
If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.
If you are a human being, please reblog.

Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 

Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

And people ask me why I am afraid to use my cane in public.

Being disabled, visibly so is always dangerous

my friend (who is a year younger than me, and we were about 18 when this happened) has a disability and has a parking permit, and one time we went out to lunch and he parked in the handicapped spot and this lady was driving by and she like slowed down when she saw us getting out of the car and like glared and we were like whatever, so we went into the restaurant and while we were waiting to get seated, some other ppl in the restaurant told him “i think that lady is doing something to your car” and we look out and shes like… inspecting the car or something like looking around it suspiciously, and so he went out to confront her and she ran off. it was so shady. people are fuckin scumbags

The last couple of years, I’ve had surgeries that have involved incisions to my abdomen. As anyone who’s been through that knows, that makes you learn REAL QUICK how important your core muscles are. I’d usually wear out and, especially in the summer/early fall months, overheat really fast from the strain. So, my physician gives me a temporary placard and advises me to use motorized carts when possible.

I can’t begin to tell you the number of dirty looks I’d get from people because, outside of sometimes using a walking stick, it wasn’t immediately obvious that there was anything wrong. If I happened to be in a store and stood up to get something from the shelf? Yep, there were a few times I got some looks and heard a few comments of the “under the breath” variety, usually just accusing me of being lazy.

The worst example came when I decided to head to the zoo for my birthday a month after surgery. People had no consideration, making it really hard for me to get around. At one particular exhibit, I was trying to navigate the cart closer, and an older gentlemen pushed his children ahead of me. I actually spoke up, offering a pretty sarcastic “excuse me” to him. He actually turned out, looked at me a moment, and said, “You don’t get special treatment just because you’re lazy.”

(It got better when another guy actually stood up for me and called the dad out on his BS, then told his kid to NOT act like that guy. Kind of an awesome moment.)

The experience really did open my eyes to what people go through, and it certainly taught me never to judge just because I can’t see what a person’s handicap is. I’m reminded of the great quote from Wendy Mass: “Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about.”

Since I haven’t posted anything in a while, I thought I’d go ahead and share some photos of our rescue can, Jackson. As you can tell from some of the photos, he’s a manx, no tail whatsoever. He’s also probably the sweetest cat I’ve ever been around.

thatscienceguy:

As children we’re taught the process of a caterpillar turning into a butterfly, and the story normally goes along the lines of a hungry caterpillar eats and eats until it can eat no longer, then it hangs upside down and forms a chrysalis, from which a beautiful butterfly emerges.
But what actually happens inside the cocoon?
It’s actually quite surprising, the caterpillar does not merely change its body a bit and grow wings, no… It dissolves. Almost entirely. The caterpillar excretes an enzyme which decomposes all the tissues and fibres into basic organic material, leaving only a few ‘cell disks.’
These cell disks comprise all the different types of cells in an adult butterfly - its eyes, legs, wings, etc. The caterpillar is actually born with them but they just remain dormant until metamorphosis. 
Once all the caterpillars cells have been decomposed the adult cell disks then start to grow, using the organic materials left over, eventually forming the butterfly that emerges a few days later.

This is really fascinating, as I’d never really looked too much into the process before. I’m going to have to now, as I’m really curious as to the theories on how this process evolved.

thatscienceguy:

As children we’re taught the process of a caterpillar turning into a butterfly, and the story normally goes along the lines of a hungry caterpillar eats and eats until it can eat no longer, then it hangs upside down and forms a chrysalis, from which a beautiful butterfly emerges.

But what actually happens inside the cocoon?

It’s actually quite surprising, the caterpillar does not merely change its body a bit and grow wings, no… It dissolves. Almost entirely. The caterpillar excretes an enzyme which decomposes all the tissues and fibres into basic organic material, leaving only a few ‘cell disks.’

These cell disks comprise all the different types of cells in an adult butterfly - its eyes, legs, wings, etc. The caterpillar is actually born with them but they just remain dormant until metamorphosis. 

Once all the caterpillars cells have been decomposed the adult cell disks then start to grow, using the organic materials left over, eventually forming the butterfly that emerges a few days later.

This is really fascinating, as I’d never really looked too much into the process before. I’m going to have to now, as I’m really curious as to the theories on how this process evolved.

More photos from my June 1st trip to the Oklahoma City Zoo. Really need to get back soon, as I’m already missing the place.

Also, it’s work mentioning that a few of my best wildlife prints, along with some other odds and ends, are up on up for auction on eBay. The proceeds from the sales will be put toward the “upgrading my gear” fund, as I think I’ve finally reached the point I’m outgrowing my current rig again.

I wanted to step out of my comfort zone and try some new things as a photography, so I called on an old friend.

I knew I was getting Ultra Magnus before I opened a single package that birthday afternoon. I can’t remember how my brother stumbled across it, but he’d found first Metroplex and later Ultra Magnus in the storage cabinet under my dad’s workbench in the garage. The day before, my mom actually caught me looking. Karma bit back; Scamper, the little robot that came with Metroplex, broke that first day.

Somewhere along the way, Ultra Magnus lost his head. Well, one of them, anyway. I don’t know if it was a prank from one of the neighborhood kids that always joined in the battle between Autobots and Decepticons, a random accident, or the result of childhood curiosity. Either way, without the smaller, inner head, Magnus couldn’t put on the helmet that gave him the more familiar appearance from the comics and cartoon.

I don’t remember where the old Optimus Prime came into things, but I remember how beat up he was. Missing an arm, legs completely loose, and the plastic windows busted out. But he still had a head, and through the miracle of remolds, Magnus’s “inner” robot was the same as the original Autobot leader. A few turns of a screwdriver, and the City Commander rejoined the battle.

His trailer and other accessories were lost to a series of moves, and he’s certainly seen better days. But Ultra Magnus joined me on road trips through Texas and moves across state lines. He was there when friends moved away, and when my parents divorced. And even now, he’s a link back to my childhood and a love of giant robots that I have not, and probably never will, let go.

Maybe I should show the old guy more respect.